The Nereid

In Greek mythology, the Nereids are sea nymphs (female spirits of sea waters), the 50 daughters of Nereus. The most notable of them is Thetis, wife of Peleus and mother of Achilles.

They symbolized everything that is beautiful and kind about sea. Their melodious voices sang as they danced around their father. (Wikipedia)

Nerissa is a name created by Shakespeare for a character in his play ‘The Merchant of Venice’ (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρεις (Nereis) meaning “nymph, sea sprite”, ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREU. (Behind the name.com).

Other mythical sea creatures include the Celtic selkies, French melusines*, ondines, and little mermaids.

*I studied Melusine by Jean d’Arras at the Sorbonne in Paris (shout-out to Sara Kleinman for suffering through that lecture with me)

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Kathleen Morrill said:
DAMN
GIRL THAT IS MAGNIFICENT
Katie Davis Says:
First, I love how you always give a little background story behind your paintings! It’s always really interesting and I always learn something new! I love all the shades of blue and how her clothing looks as it flows around her underwater! This is just so graceful and magical looking and it’s really captivating to look at! I love the little bubbles going up to the surface and how, since the water is black, she really stands out! So very beautiful!

A Greek Theme

In the past months I have read a lot of Greek mythology, Alexander the Great biographies by Phillip Freeman and Robin Lane Fox and the Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller. So I fueled up on Greek yogurt and feta cheese to produce these Hellenic themed acrylics on canvas. Special thanks to fellow artist Kathleen for your feedback!

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The Death of Achilles, 2016 based on the sculpture Dying Achilles by Ernst Herter

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Olive Oil, 2016

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Figs, 2016

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Human, 2016, watercolor (based on a sculpture by unknown artist at darkdecadence.tumblr)

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 Angel Uriel , 2016 (based on dresses from Dolce & Gabbanna Fall 2014; this type of art is also present in Orthodox Christian Churches in the Balkans and Eastern Europe)

La Belle Epoque – Aged 20 – 2013

After a long, long time, I am finally posting this painting I did a while back before leaving home. This is honor of my year abroad in Paris. It depicts the Belle Epoque of Paris; a time of corsets, artists and rising industrialism.

La Belle Epoque, 2013

La Belle Epoque, 2013

The Ruins of Gaziantep – 2013 (aged 20)

In celebration of my blog’s one year anniversary, I decided to post this painting of the interior of the Gaziantep Mosaics Museum in the southeast of Turkey. This is based on a picture I took while I was there. I replaced the ceiling with the night sky. The museum collection consists of mosaics, pillars and walls excavated in ancient Zeugma (an old city within the Gaziantep Province). All the artifacts are Roman in design and nature.

The Ruins of Gaziantep, 2013

The Ruins of Gaziantep, 2013

Gaziantep is situated between the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers in classic Mesopotamia.

Les Dames de l’Hamam – 2013 (Aged 20)

While in Istanbul, I went to the Cemberlitas Hamam (Turkish bath) near the Grand Bazaar. I absolutely loved the experience and I decided to paint it.  I maintain the title in French.

Les Dames de l'Hamam, 2013

Les Dames de l’Hamam, 2013

2013-Amerique du Sud-Aged 19

This is the last thing I will paint before hopping off to school tomorrow. This woman personifies South America and she is the first painting of 2013 and the fourth in the continent series.

Unlike the others, this woman was created with more cultural inspiration. I looked at images from Machu Picchu to get ideas for the rock and ground. The background is based on the snowy mountains in Bolivia.

I placed the woman in a seated position to emulate the Incan sitting mummies. If I am historically correct, the Inca sacrificed a child to the gods by taking this child up to a mountain top. Once there, the children were killed or were allowed to die of exposure to the elements. In many cases the child was then placed in a sitting position, wrapped and naturally mummified. Today many such mummies have been found in the hilltops of Peru.

I also studied images of native South American women to capture the high, prominent cheekbones and braided hairstyles.

Amerique du Sud, 2013

Amerique du Sud, 2013

I have already painted women from:

The Middle East : https://lastoftheromanticists.wordpress.com/2012/12/19/2012-arabe-aged-19/

Far East Asia : https://lastoftheromanticists.wordpress.com/2012/12/21/2012-asie-aged-19/

and North America : https://lastoftheromanticists.wordpress.com/2012/12/24/2012-amerique-du-nord-aged-19/

Over the summer I will finally get to put together Africa and Europe.

2012-Amerique du Nord-Aged 19

After going to school in New England for over a year now I thought it would come the time when I would have to paint something related to the region. So I did this with my North American girl.  Bates College is in the state of Maine and the original inhabitants were from the Wabanaki tribe.  The first European settlers in this region were French.

I maintain the titles in French.

Amerique du Nord, 2012

Amerique du Nord, 2012